Oxidative stress and neurodegeneration : the possible contribution of quinone reductase 2 - fdi:010072833 - Horizon

Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

Cassagnes L. E., Chhour M., Perio Pierre, Sudor J., Gayon R., Ferry G., Boutin J. A., Nepveu F., Reybier K. (2018). Oxidative stress and neurodegeneration : the possible contribution of quinone reductase 2. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 120, 56-61. ISSN 0891-5849

Accès réservé (Intranet IRD) Document en accès réservé (Intranet IRD)

Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2018.03.002

Titre
Oxidative stress and neurodegeneration : the possible contribution of quinone reductase 2
Année de publication2018
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000431771500006
AuteursCassagnes L. E., Chhour M., Perio Pierre, Sudor J., Gayon R., Ferry G., Boutin J. A., Nepveu F., Reybier K.
SourceFree Radical Biology and Medicine, 2018, 120, p. 56-61. ISSN 0891-5849
RésuméThere is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is due in part to the reactivity of catecholamines, such as dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. These molecules are rapidly converted, chemically or enzymatically, into catechol-quinone and then into highly deleterious semiquinone radicals after 1-electron reduction in cells. Notably, the overexpression of dihydronicotinamide riboside: quinone oxidoreductase (QR2) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells increases the production of ROS, mainly superoxide radicals, when it is exposed to exogenous catechol-quinones (e.g. dopachrome, aminochrome, and adrenochrome). Here we used electron paramagnetic resonance analysis to demonstrate that the phenomenon observed in CHO cells is also seen in human leukemic cells (K562 cells) that naturally express QR2. Moreover, by manipulating the level of QR2 in neuronal cells, including immortalized neuroblast cells and ex vivo neurons isolated from QR2 knockout animals, we showed that there is a direct relationship between QR2-mediated quinone reduction and ROS overproduction. Supporting this result, the withdraw of the QR2 co-factor (BNAH) or the addition of the specific QR2 inhibitor S29434 suppressed oxidative stress. Taken together, these data suggest that the overexpression of QR2 in brain cells in the presence of catechol quinones might lead to ROS-induced cell death via the rapid conversion of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and then into highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Thus, QR2 may be implicated in the early stages of neurodegenerative disorders.
Plan de classementSanté : généralités [050] ; Sciences fondamentales / Techniques d'analyse et de recherche [020]
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010072833]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010072833
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010072833

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


Accès aux documents originaux :

Le FDI est labellisé CollEx

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Nouméa

Papeete

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito