Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

 

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

Abram N. J., Mulvaney R., Vimeux Françoise, Phipps S. J., Turner J., England M. H. (2014). Evolution of the Southern Annular Mode during the past millennium. Nature Climate Change, 4 (7), 564-569. ISSN 1758-678X

Accès réservé (Intranet IRD) Demander le PDF

Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1038/nclimate2235

Titre
Evolution of the Southern Annular Mode during the past millennium
Année de publication2014
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000338837400020
AuteursAbram N. J., Mulvaney R., Vimeux Françoise, Phipps S. J., Turner J., England M. H.
SourceNature Climate Change, 2014, 4 (7), p. 564-569. ISSN 1758-678X
RésuméThe Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is the primary pattern of climate variability in the Southern Hemisphere(1,2), influencing latitudinal rainfall distribution and temperatures from the subtropics to Antarctica. The positive summer trend in the SAM over recent decades is widely attributed to stratospheric ozone depletion(2); however, the brevity of observational records from Antarctica(1)-one of the core zones that defines SAM variability-limits our understanding of long-term SAM behaviour. Here we reconstruct annual mean changes in the SAM since AD 1000 using, for the first time, proxy records that encompass the full mid-latitude to polar domain across the Drake Passage sector. We find that the SAM has undergone a progressive shift towards its positive phase since the fifteenth century, causing cooling of the main Antarctic continent at the same time that the Antarctic Peninsula has warmed. The positive trend in the SAM since similar to AD 1940 is reproduced by multimodel climate simulations forced with rising greenhouse gas levels and later ozone depletion, and the long-term average SAM index is now at its highest level for at least the past 1,000 years. Reconstructed SAM trends before the twentieth century are more prominent than those in radiative-forcing climate experiments and may be associated with a teleconnected response to tropical Pacific climate. Our findings imply that predictions of further greenhouse-driven increases in the SAM over the coming century(3) also need to account for the possibility of opposing effects from tropical Pacific climate changes.
Plan de classementLimnologie physique / Océanographie physique [032] ; Sciences du milieu [021]
Descr. géo.ANTARCTIQUE ; PACIFIQUE SUD
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010062355]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010062355
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010062355

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


Accès aux documents originaux :

Le FDI est labellisé CollEx

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Cayenne

Nouméa

Papeete

Abidjan

Dakar

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito