Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

 

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

Branch T. A., Stafford K. M., Palacios D. M., Allison C., Bannister J. L., Burton C. L. K., Cabrera E., Carlson C. A., Vernazzani B. G., Gill P. C., Hucke Gaete R., Jenner K. C. S., Jenner M. N. M., Matsuoka K., Mikhalev Y. A., Miyashita T., Morrice M. G., Nishiwaki S., Sturrock V. J., Tormosov D., Anderson R. C., Baker A. N., Best P. B., Borsa Philippe, Brownell R. L., Childerhouse S., Findlay K. P., Gerrodette T., Ilangakoon A. D., Joergensen M., Kahn B., Ljungblad D. K., Maughan B., McCauley R. D., McKay S., Norris T. F., Whale O., Rankin S., Samaran F., Thiele D., Van Waerebeek K., Warneke R. M. (2007). Past and present distribution, densities and movements of blue whales Balaenoptera musculus in the Southern Hemisphere and northern Indian Ocean. Mammal Review, 37 (2), 116-175. ISSN 0305-1838

Accès réservé (Intranet IRD) Demander le PDF

Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1111/j.1365-2907.2007.00106.x

Titre
Past and present distribution, densities and movements of blue whales Balaenoptera musculus in the Southern Hemisphere and northern Indian Ocean
Année de publication2007
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000247227900002
AuteursBranch T. A., Stafford K. M., Palacios D. M., Allison C., Bannister J. L., Burton C. L. K., Cabrera E., Carlson C. A., Vernazzani B. G., Gill P. C., Hucke Gaete R., Jenner K. C. S., Jenner M. N. M., Matsuoka K., Mikhalev Y. A., Miyashita T., Morrice M. G., Nishiwaki S., Sturrock V. J., Tormosov D., Anderson R. C., Baker A. N., Best P. B., Borsa Philippe, Brownell R. L., Childerhouse S., Findlay K. P., Gerrodette T., Ilangakoon A. D., Joergensen M., Kahn B., Ljungblad D. K., Maughan B., McCauley R. D., McKay S., Norris T. F., Whale O., Rankin S., Samaran F., Thiele D., Van Waerebeek K., Warneke R. M.
SourceMammal Review, 2007, 37 (2), p. 116-175. ISSN 0305-1838
Résumé1. Blue whale locations in the Southern Hemisphere and northern Indian Ocean were obtained from catches (303 239), sightings (4383 records of >= 8058 whales), strandings (103), Discovery marks (2191) and recoveries (95), and acoustic recordings. 2. Sighting surveys included 7 480 450 km of effort plus 14 676 days with unmeasured effort. Groups usually consisted of solitary whales (65.2%) or pairs (24.6%); larger feeding aggregations of unassociated individuals were only rarely observed. Sighting rates (groups per 1000 km from many platform types) varied by four orders of magnitude and were lowest in the waters of Brazil, South Africa, the eastern tropical Pacific, Antarctica and South Georgia; higher in the Subantarctic and Peru; and highest around Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Chile, southern Australia and south of Madagascar. 3. Blue whales avoid the oligotrophic central gyres of the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, but are more common where phytoplankton densities are high, and where there are dynamic oceanographic processes like upwelling and frontal meandering. 4. Compared with historical catches, the Antarctic ('true') subspecies is exceedingly rare and usually concentrated closer to the summer pack ice. In summer they are found throughout the Antarctic; in winter they migrate to southern Africa (although recent sightings there are rare) and to other northerly locations (based on acoustics), although some overwinter in the Antarctic. 5. Pygmy blue whales are found around the Indian Ocean and from southern Australia to New Zealand. At least four groupings are evident: northern Indian Ocean, from Madagascar to the Subantarctic, Indonesia to western and southern Australia, and from New Zealand northwards to the equator. Sighting rates are typically much higher than for Antarctic blue whales. 6. South-east Pacific blue whales have a discrete distribution and high sighting rates compared with the Antarctic. Further work is needed to clarify their subspecific status given their distinctive genetics, acoustics and length frequencies. 7. Antarctic blue whales numbered 1700 (95% Bayesian interval 860-2900) in 1996 (less than 1% of original levels), but are increasing at 7.3% per annum (95% Bayesian interval 1.4-11.6%). The status of other populations in the Southern Hemisphere and northern Indian Ocean is unknown because few abundance estimates are available, but higher recent sighting rates suggest that they are less depleted than Antarctic blue whales.
Plan de classementSciences du monde animal [080] ; Ecologie, systèmes aquatiques [036]
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010040640]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010040640
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010040640

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


Accès aux documents originaux :

Le FDI est labellisé CollEx

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Cayenne

Nouméa

Papeete

Abidjan

Dakar

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito