Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

 

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

Delpeuch Francis (collab.), Kameli Yves (collab.), Maire Bernard (collab.), Martin-Prevel Yves (collab.), Savy Mathilde (collab.), Traissac Pierre (collab.), N. C. D. Risk Factor Collaboration. (2019). Rising rural body-mass index is the main driver of the global obesity epidemic in adults. Nature, 569 (7755), 260-264 + 17 p.. ISSN 0028-0836

Fichier PDF disponiblehttp://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/divers19-05/010075665.pdf[ PDF Link ]

Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1171-x

Titre
Rising rural body-mass index is the main driver of the global obesity epidemic in adults
Année de publication2019
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000467473600049
AuteursDelpeuch Francis (collab.), Kameli Yves (collab.), Maire Bernard (collab.), Martin-Prevel Yves (collab.), Savy Mathilde (collab.), Traissac Pierre (collab.), N. C. D. Risk Factor Collaboration.
SourceNature, 2019, 569 (7755), p. 260-264 + 17 p.. ISSN 0028-0836
RésuméBody-mass index (BMI) has increased steadily in most countries in parallel with a rise in the proportion of the population who live in cities(.)(1,2) This has led to a widely reported view that urbanization is one of the most important drivers of the global rise in obesity(3-6). Here we use 2,009 population-based studies, with measurements of height and weight in more than 112 million adults, to report national, regional and global trends in mean BMI segregated by place of residence (a rural or urban area) from 1985 to 2017. We show that, contrary to the dominant paradigm, more than 55% of the global rise in mean BMI from 1985 to 2017-and more than 80% in some low- and middle-income regions-was due to increases in BMI in rural areas. This large contribution stems from the fact that, with the exception of women in sub-Saharan Africa, BMI is increasing at the same rate or faster in rural areas than in cities in low- and middle-income regions. These trends have in turn resulted in a closing-and in some countries reversal-of the gap in BMI between urban and rural areas in low- and middle-income countries, especially for women. In high-income and industrialized countries, we noted a persistently higher rural BMI, especially for women. There is an urgent need for an integrated approach to rural nutrition that enhances financial and physical access to healthy foods, to avoid replacing the rural undernutrition disadvantage in poor countries with a more general malnutrition disadvantage that entails excessive consumption of low-quality calories.
Plan de classementNutrition, alimentation [054]
Descr. géo.MONDE
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010075665]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010075665
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010075665

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


* PDF Link :

    à télécharger pour citer/partager ce document sur les réseaux sociaux académiques


Accès aux documents originaux :

Le FDI est labellisé CollEx

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Cayenne

Nouméa

Papeete

Abidjan

Dakar

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito