Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

David P., Thebault E., Anneville O ., Duyck P.F., Chapuis Elodie, Loeuille N. (2017). Impacts of invasive species on food webs : a review of empirical data . In : Bohan D.A. (ed.), Dumbrell A.J. (ed.), Massol F. (ed.) Networks of invasion : a synthesis of concepts. Londres : Elsevier, (56), 1-60. (Advances in Botanical Research ; 56). ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8

Accès réservé (Intranet IRD) Document en accès réservé (Intranet IRD)

Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1016/bs.aecr.2016.10.001

Titre
Impacts of invasive species on food webs : a review of empirical data
Année de publication2017
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000403546000002
AuteursDavid P., Thebault E., Anneville O ., Duyck P.F., Chapuis Elodie, Loeuille N.
InBohan D.A. (ed.), Dumbrell A.J. (ed.), Massol F. (ed.) Networks of invasion : a synthesis of concepts
SourceLondres : Elsevier, 2017, p. 1-60. (Advances in Botanical Research ; 56). ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8
RésuméWe review empirical studies on how bioinvasions alter food webs and how a food-web perspective may change their prediction and management. Predation is found to underlie the most spectacular damage in invaded systems, sometimes cascading down to primary producers. Indirect trophic effects (exploitative and apparent competition) also affect native species, but rarely provoke extinctions, while invaders often have positive bottom-up effects on higher trophic levels. As a result of these trophic interactions, and of nontrophic ones such as mutualisms or ecosystem engineering, invasions can profoundly modify the structure of the entire food web. While few studies have been undertaken at this scale, those that have highlight how network properties such as species richness, phenotypic diversity, and functional diversity, limit the likelihood and impacts of invasions by saturating niche space. Vulnerable communities have unsaturated niche space mainly because of evolutionary history in isolation (islands), dispersal limitation, or anthropogenic disturbance. Evolution also modulates the insertion of invaders into a food web. Exotics and natives are evolutionarily new to one another, and invasion tends to retain alien species that happen to have advantage over residents in trophic interactions. Resident species, therefore, often rapidly evolve traits to better tolerate or exploit invaders—a process that may eventually restore more balanced food webs and prevent extinctions. We discuss how network-based principles might guide management policies to better live with invaders, rather than to undertake the daunting (and often illusory) task of eradicating them one by one.
Plan de classementSciences du monde végétal [076]
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010070476]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010070476
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010070476

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


Accès aux documents originaux :

Le FDI est labellisé CollEx

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Nouméa

Papeete

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito