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Lippens C., Estoup A., Hima M. K., Loiseau A., Tatard C., Dalecky Ambroise, Ba K., Kane M., Diallo M., Sow A., Niang Y., Piry S., Berthier K., Leblois R., Duplantier Jean-Marc, Brouat Carine. (2017). Genetic structure and invasion history of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) in Senegal, West Africa : a legacy of colonial and contemporary times. Heredity, 119 (2), 64-75. ISSN 0018-067X

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Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1038/hdy.2017.18

Titre
Genetic structure and invasion history of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) in Senegal, West Africa : a legacy of colonial and contemporary times
Année de publication2017
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000405484200002
AuteursLippens C., Estoup A., Hima M. K., Loiseau A., Tatard C., Dalecky Ambroise, Ba K., Kane M., Diallo M., Sow A., Niang Y., Piry S., Berthier K., Leblois R., Duplantier Jean-Marc, Brouat Carine.
SourceHeredity, 2017, 119 (2), p. 64-75. ISSN 0018-067X
RésuméKnowledge of the genetic make-up and demographic history of invasive populations is critical to understand invasion mechanisms. Commensal rodents are ideal models to study whether complex invasion histories are typical of introductions involving human activities. The house mouse Mus musculus domesticus is a major invasive synanthropic rodent originating from South-West Asia. It has been largely studied in Europe and on several remote islands, but the genetic structure and invasion history of this taxon have been little investigated in several continental areas, including West Africa. In this study, we focussed on invasive populations of M. m. domesticus in Senegal. In this focal area for European settlers, the distribution area and invasion spread of the house mouse is documented by decades of data on commensal rodent communities. Genetic variation at one mitochondrial locus and 16 nuclear microsatellite markers was analysed from individuals sampled in 36 sites distributed across the country. A combination of phylogeographic and population genetics methods showed that there was a single introduction event on the northern coast of Senegal, from an exogenous (probably West European) source, followed by a secondary introduction from northern Senegal into a coastal site further south. The geographic locations of these introduction sites were consistent with the colonial history of Senegal. Overall, the marked microsatellite genetic structure observed in Senegal, even between sites located close together, revealed a complex interplay of different demographic processes occurring during house mouse spatial expansion, including sequential founder effects and stratified dispersal due to human transport along major roads.
Plan de classementSciences du monde animal [080]
Descr. géo.SENEGAL
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010070314]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010070314
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010070314

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