Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

Clements K. D., German D. P., Piche J., Tribollet Aline, Choat J. H. (2017). Integrating ecological roles and trophic diversification on coral reefs : multiple lines of evidence identify parrotfishes as microphages. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 120 (4), 729-751. ISSN 0024-4066

Accès réservé (Intranet IRD) Document en accès réservé (Intranet IRD)

Titre
Integrating ecological roles and trophic diversification on coral reefs : multiple lines of evidence identify parrotfishes as microphages
Année de publication2017
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000400945300001
AuteursClements K. D., German D. P., Piche J., Tribollet Aline, Choat J. H.
SourceBiological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2017, 120 (4), p. 729-751. ISSN 0024-4066
RésuméCoral reef ecosystems are remarkable for their high productivity in nutrient-poor waters. A high proportion of primary production is consumed by the dominant herbivore assemblage, teleost fishes, many of which are the product of recent and rapid diversification. Our review and synthesis of the trophodynamics of herbivorous reef fishes suggests that current models underestimate the level of resource partitioning, and thus trophic innovation, in this diverse assemblage. We examine several lines of evidence including feeding observations, trophic anatomy, and biochemical analyses of diet, tissue composition and digestive processes to show that the prevailing view (including explicit models) of parrotfishes as primary consumers of macroscopic algae is incompatible with available data. Instead, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that most parrotfishes are microphages that target cyanobacteria and other protein-rich autotrophic microorganisms that live on (epilithic) or within (endolithic) calcareous substrata, are epiphytic on algae or seagrasses, or endosymbiotic within sessile invertebrates. This novel view of parrotfish feeding biology provides a unified explanation for the apparently disparate range of feeding substrata used by parrotfishes, and integrates parrotfish nutrition with their ecological roles in reef bioerosion and sediment transport. Accelerated evolution in parrotfishes can now be explained as the result of (1) the ability to utilize a novel food resource for reef fishes, i.e. microscopic autotrophs; and (2) the partitioning of this resource by habitat and successional stage.
Plan de classementEcologie, systèmes aquatiques [036] ; Limnologie biologique / Océanographie biologique [034]
Descr. géo.PACIFIQUE ; OCEAN INDIEN ; ATLANTIQUE ; CARAIBE ; ZONE TROPICALE
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010070008]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010070008
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010070008

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


Accès aux documents originaux :

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Nouméa

Papeete

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito