Horizon / Plein textes La base de ressources documentaires de l'IRD

IRD

 

Publications des scientifiques de l'IRD

Kamgang B., Ngoagouni C., Manirakiza A., Nakouné E., Paupy Christophe, Kazanji M. (2013). Temporal patterns of abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera : Culicidae) and mitochondrial DNA analysis of Ae. albopictus in the Central African Republic. Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases, 7 (12), e2590. ISSN 1935-2735

Fichier PDF disponiblehttp://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/divers17-10/010061448.pdf[ PDF Link ]

Lien direct chez l'éditeur doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002590

Titre
Temporal patterns of abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera : Culicidae) and mitochondrial DNA analysis of Ae. albopictus in the Central African Republic
Année de publication2013
Type de documentArticle référencé dans le Web of Science WOS:000329168100002
AuteursKamgang B., Ngoagouni C., Manirakiza A., Nakouné E., Paupy Christophe, Kazanji M.
SourcePlos Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2013, 7 (12), p. e2590. p. e2590 ISSN 1935-2735
RésuméThe invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) was first reported in central Africa in 2000, in Cameroon, with the indigenous mosquito species Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Today, this invasive species is present in almost all countries of the region, including the Central African Republic (CAR), where it was first recorded in 2009. As invasive species of mosquitoes can affect the distribution of native species, resulting in new patterns of vectors and concomitant risk for disease, we undertook a comparative study early and late in the wet season in the capital and the main cities of CAR to document infestation and the ecological preferences of the two species. In addition, we determined the probable geographical origin of invasive populations of Ae. albopictus with two mitochondrial DNA genes, COI and ND5. Analysis revealed that Ae. aegypti was more abundant earlier in the wet season and Ae. albopictus in the late wet season. Used tyres were the most heavily colonized productive larval habitats for both species in both seasons. The invasive species Ae. albopictus predominated over the resident species at all sites in which the two species were sympatric. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed broad low genetic diversity, confirming recent introduction of Ae. albopictus in CAR. Phylogeographical analysis based on COI polymorphism indicated that the Ae. albopictus haplotype in the CAR population segregated into two lineages, suggesting multiple sources of Ae. albopictus. These data may have important implications for vector control strategies in central Africa. Author SummaryAedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main vectors of human arboviral diseases such as dengue and chikungunya. Ae. aegypti is indigenous in the Central African Republic (CAR), whereas Ae. Albopictus, originating from Asian forests, was first reported in 2009. To determine the consequences of this invasion of Ae. albopictus for epidemiological transmission of arboviruses, we conducted a comparative study in the early and late wet season in the capital, Bangui, and in the other main cities of the country to document infestation by the two species and their ecological preferences. In addition, we explored the geographical origin of populations of Ae. albopictus with two mitochondrial DNA genes (COI and ND5). We demonstrate that Ae. aegypti predominates early and Ae. albopictus late in the wet season. Ae. albopictus was the most prevalent species in almost all the sites investigated, except Bouar, where only Ae. aegypti was found, suggesting that Ae. albopictus tends to supplant Ae. aegypti in sympatric areas. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed broad low genetic diversity, confirming recent introduction of Ae. albopictus. Phylogeographical analysis with MtDNA COI gene suggested that Ae. albopictus in CAR came from multiple invasions and from multiple population sources.
Plan de classementEntomologie médicale / Parasitologie / Virologie [052]
Descr. géo.CENTRAFRIQUE
LocalisationFonds IRD [F B010061448]
Identifiant IRDfdi:010061448
Lien permanenthttp://www.documentation.ird.fr/hor/fdi:010061448

Export des données

Disponibilité des documents

Télechargment fichier PDF téléchargeable

Lien sur le Web lien chez l'éditeur

Accès réservé en accès réservé

HAL en libre accès sur HAL


* PDF Link :

    à télécharger pour citer/partager ce document sur les réseaux sociaux académiques


Accès aux documents originaux :

Le FDI est labellisé CollEx

Accès direct

Bureau du chercheur

Site de la documentation

Espace intranet IST (accès réservé)

Suivi des publications IRD (accès réservé)

Mentions légales

Services Horizon

Poser une question

Consulter l'aide en ligne

Déposer une publication (accès réservé)

S'abonner au flux RSS

Voir les tableaux chronologiques et thématiques

Centres de documentation

Bondy

Montpellier (centre IRD)

Montpellier (MSE)

Cayenne

Nouméa

Papeete

Abidjan

Dakar

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Tunis

La Paz

Quito